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Disaster Planning

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​Agents Council for Technology: It's Time to Update Your Disaster Plan  
This article provides agents with a succinct checklist of the major issues they should be considering to assure the continuity of their operations should they be struck by a disaster, a major virus, or an equipment failure of some sort (power, systems, communications, etc.)  
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Agents Council for Technology: Key Considerations in Disaster Planning and Management
This checklist reflects the lessons learned from recent disasters and is applicable to every agency. It emphasizes systems, telecomminucations, and people issues.    
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Agents Council for Technology: The Lessons Learned from Recent Disasters and Recommendations for Improved Response for Independent Agencies and the Industry

​ACT set up this work group following the horrific disasters in 2005 to assess the lessons learned, so that we could be better prepared for future events. Several agents directly involved in the 2005 hurricanes served on this work group. The report covers a number of different aspects of agency disaster planning and provides helpful tips in each of these areas.
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Agents Council for Technology:​ Some Communications & Technology Lessons Learned From Katrina 
This article traces the experiences of an agency managing its way through the aftermath of Katrina and points out lessons relating to communications and technology that will be helpful to all agencies in their own disaster planning.  CLICK HERE

Catastrophes in the Workplace
This article will address the issues facing employers and steps to take in the event of a workplace catastrophe.  It assumes that any injuries and/or deaths arose out of and in the course of employment, and therefore, are compensable under the Georgia Workers’ Compensation Act.  Read Article

Must Employees Be Paid When the Office is Closed?
It is important for agency owners and employees alike to be aware of the rules applicable to the payment of employees when the agency office is closed due to such events.  As with any question regarding the payment of employees, the analysis begins with the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”), which set the rules for how long employees may be required to work and how much they must be paid for the time spent working.  State law may supplement the rules established by the FLSA, but since Georgia is an “at will” employment state and has no applicable law regarding this subject, the FLSA’s rules are the only ones that agency owners and employees need to be familiar with.  Read Article​